high fashion toothpaste

No, I’m not kidding.

In a prowl through various websites trying to make their product most attractive to the consumer, Marvis Toothpaste was just trying too hard.

http://www.marvismint.com/ wanted so badly to astound the user with their expensive graphics and unique approach to make toothpaste chic, which I can’t believe is a reality.  Moreover, Marvis Mint was so very close to accomplishing this goal — so very close.

Nevertheless, fate fell short.

The positives:

  • The music was chill and brought good vibes to their museum-like design
  • The graphics were continual and it was evident a lot of thought went into them
  • The advertising section was boss — innovative designs that without a doubt combined fashion and toothpaste like Marvis had intended
  • The website was interactive, allowing one to tour the gallery of toothpaste
  • Clear visual presentation and hierarchy of design
  • Clear menu and designated areas
  • Made one want to look at toothpaste

The negatives:

  • LOADING. Whether high or low quality, toothpaste just wasn’t suspenseful enough to hold me on the page during the long periods of time necessary for the expensive graphics to load, no matter how badly I wanted to know why it was so contemprary and trendy
  • The screen moved ever so slightly — perhaps half an inch in whatever direction the mouse was headed. The tiny movements gave a dizzying, unstable effect and were a distraction
  • Long introduction, long wait in general
  • Can’t order the toothpaste from the site
  • Can’t find a place on the site that tells me where I can buy their special toothpaste
  • Doesn’t give price of toothpaste
  • Doesn’t have user reviews, ingredient listings, or any actual information about the toothpaste other than flavors
  • Doesn’t tell me why the toothpaste is “contemporary”, but constantly tells me that it is contemporary and innovative

Overall? Cool idea, poor execution.  Calm down toothpaste, stick to fresh breath not flashy fashion.

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This entry was posted in Communication Theory and Practice: Fall 2012, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

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